A MOUTHFUL: PLEASANT LADY JIAN BING TRADING STALL

FOOD STALL/DINING 

From an unassuming window just off the corner of Old Compton Street and Greek Street, comfort food, Chinese-style, is being dispensed to the Soho masses, an offshoot hatch (framed in a pleasant salmon pink) from neighbouring restaurant Bun House. The dish is jian bing, a crepe-like item (also cousin to the burrito or traditional bap, according to founder Z He) that is the most popular street food on the avenues of China, a plethora of apertures pervading the central quarters feeding happy students and city workers. The process starts with what appears as a buckwheat base (actually a batter composed of ten essential grains) cooked on a copper griddle onto which an egg is broken and quickly added is cilantro, a sweet soy sauce and a dense dressing of fermented beans, sesame paste and peanut butter, finished off with (the truly innovative ingredient) crushed wonton chips, then folded over and placed in a signature paper bag and ready for takeaway and eating on the street as you stroll to your next destination. To the basic crepe (£6) may be added Iberico pork, miso chicken or cumin lamb (anywhere from a £1-£1.80 surcharge). On my visit, the preparation was painstaking (perhaps as a result of being the first customer, the griddles may have needed time to properly heat) and precise, which, if not course corrected as the day progresses, could lead to frustrating queues. I’m certain that the pace of the cooking quickens as the day goes on and the demand rises (and griddle temperature maximises). Legend has it that a chancellor was tasked with providing a regiment of soldiers who had all lost their woks with a nourishing meal and so had cooks concoct an easy and efficient recipe with simple ingredients, received by the army with such ardor that they quickly fought their way out of an ambush and into significant victory, strengthened and heartened by this culinary invention. The source of the “pleasant lady” moniker heralds from an approximation of the last character of He’s name. For this elegant, graceful stand, it works.

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